Category: Politics

Photos Politics

Keswick Climate Strike

Today, supported by my company, I attended the Climate Strike in Keswick, organised by pupils at the Keswick School who are members of the UK Student Climate Network. This formed part of a Global Climate Strike that has been coordinated by 350.org and FridaysForFuture. It has been such an inspiring day, and I wanted to get the photos that I had taken posted as soon as possible.

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Opinions Politics

Have we passed peak Farage?

The narrative at the moment has been one of Nigel Farage in ascendancy, leading his plucky band of Faragistas in a Brexit revolt against the “metropolitan liberal elite”. Much coverage has been given to his rallies, and one could easily assume that the masses are flocking to him.

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Politics

Updated with reply from BBC: Andrew Neil rubbishes scientific consensus in first minutes of This Week

This week, I managed to get no further than one minute and 25 seconds into this week’s episode of This Week (is that enough “this weeks”?), before Andrew Neil had me back on the BBC’s complaints site.

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Opinions Politics

I wrote to my MP to ask her to support my views in a parliamentary debate, her response was to tell me I was wrong and she didn’t even attend the debate

(Update: It turns out she also didn’t bother to actually write a letter to me either, see the bottom of the post.)

For a multitude of reasons, I support proportional representation (PR) systems of voting. The UK currently operates a first-past-the-post (FPTP) system of voting. This means that almost every Government in power in the UK rules without the majority of the country’s support (in fact, far from it).

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Politics

A Green perspective on the Copeland by-election, and a rallying cry for a better electoral system

Last Thursday, history was made as the Conservatives took the Copeland parliamentary seat from the Labour Party. The seat had been held by Labour for 82 years, and it’s the first time a governing party has won a seat from the opposition in a by-election since 1982. And as the Conservatives have been proudly touting, it’s the first time a comparable by-election win has occurred for well over a century. While undoubtedly a seismic event, a closer inspection of the numbers, and of the events that took place during the by-election campaign, reveals a host of curiosities.

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Politics

Copeland by-election: opposing nuclear power, and voting Green, is the only rational choice

Originally published by The Ecologist on 17 February 2017.

The media, and every other candidate in next week’s Copeland by-election, have fallen prey to the nuclear industry’s mighty PR machine by backing the planned Moorside nuclear mega-project just next to the Sellafield site.

Trying to set the story straight is an uphill struggle, and can at times be maddening. But it’s worth the fight.

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Politics

Why there is no progressive alliance in Copeland

Published on Left Foot Forward on Thursday 2 February 2017. This is the unabridged version!

On Friday 13 January, the Green Party announced that it would be standing a candidate in the Copeland by-election. A decision had been reached by the local party in Copeland at its AGM the evening before. Within minutes of the announcement, onlookers on social media questioned why there was apparently no progressive alliance for the seat.

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